Radiators unite all homes in the UK. Whether they’re tall, short, low, high, wide or narrow, they’re one of the most common features, providing heat to your living space. While you may think that these items offer nothing more than functionality, interior designers and architects are embracing radiators in their home designs to give them a flourish. One type of radiator that has experienced a surge in popularity is the vertical radiator.

Flexible in any space

Otherwise known as column radiators, these provide as much heat as more traditional designs but have the added bonus of being able to fit into a wider range of spaces. Sitting tightly against a wall, these radiators are thinner, giving a closer fit than horizontal radiators for a more streamlined appearance. They lend themselves well to modern interiors, particularly bathroom and kitchen settings.

It is this thinner shape that allows them to blend seamlessly in the dead space behind doors and makes them suitable for designs where they are obscured to the human eye by hidden walls.

Ideal for older buildings

With a thinner design comes a lighter item. Even the longest of vertical blinds usually weighs less than traditional cast iron radiators. This has led them to be used often in older properties.It is this thinner shape that allows them to blend seamlessly in the dead space behind doors and makes them suitable for designs where they are obscured to the human eye by hidden walls.The vertical lines of these radiators, like those found at http://apolloradiators.co.uk/Products/View/3/54/7/category/roma/Apollo-roma-bespoke-steel-column-radiator, are also particularly attractive against the high ceilings of older properties, stretching the height of the room to astronomic ascensions. These bold column-like structures sit alongside period furniture without obstruction because of their extended height.

Versatile in design

Line is used often in design to add interest to a space and tie a design together. In fact, there’s a theory within the design world called the Line Theory that works on the principle that different lines create different moods. Horizontals are relaxing and remind people of the horizon; vertical lines are bold, and diagonals exude energy.

It’s no surprise that these hard-working, versatile radiators have attracted lots of love from interior designers and architects, who have used them to create a focal point in an otherwise bland room. While you may think that these items offer nothing more than functionality, interior designers and architects are embracing radiators in their home designs to give them a flourish. There are many designs available with features such as curved edges, grooves and bespoke colours to suit any home, making them a simple-to-install addition that can have a huge impact.